Inadequacies of research used to monitor change to rock art and regulate industry on Murujuga (PDF 3.8MB)

John L. Black, Ilona Box and Simon Diffey
Abstract. Murujuga (‘Burrup Peninsula’) in northwest Western Australia contains the largest concentration of petroglyphs in the world. A substantial petrochemical industrial complex has been placed in close proximity to this cultural treasure. A review of the publically available research reports used by governments to justify establishment of industry and the levels of acceptable emissions reveals the research is not scientifically credible in design, methodology, analysis or interpretation. Each report has serious errors, which renders most results to be of little value. There remains a knowledge deficit on the condition of petroglyphs. No credible decisions about the effects of industry on the rock art can be made using the reports.

Citation:
Black, John L; Box, Ilona and Diffey, Simon. Inadequacies of research used to monitor change to rock art and regulate industry on Murujuga (‘Burrup Peninsula’), Australia. Rock Art Research: The Journal of the Australian Rock Art Research Association (AURA), Vol. 34, No. 2, Nov 2017: 130-148.