Another urgent appeal as more industry threatens the Burrup rock art.

(Thanks for Robin Chapple MLC for the text below)


Dear friends

Last week we sent you an email about the world’s oldest and largest collection of rock art that has never been closer to destruction than right now.

Unfortunately since that last correspondence two more projects have emerged, that is the North West Shelf Project Extension and the Pluto North West Shelf Interconnector Pipeline. If you go to the bottom of these respective pages and click on 1.Referal the details of these projects is provided.

A third project for a new Gas train on the Woodside Pluto site will not be assessed as permission was granted for this train under its original approval.

Again the Government has only given the public one week to comment on the two proposals, if we don’t flood the referral system with calls for a Public Environment Review, the Burrup will move further away from world heritage protection.

There has never been a more important moment for the Burrup than right now.

We only have until the 27th November 2018 to demand the government undertakes a Public Environmental Review of these two proposed projects.

You can help stop these plants from going ahead.

  • Please get your comments into the Environmental Protection Authority before 27 November.
  • Follow the links below
    • enter in your details check “Assess – Public environmental review”
    • copy our proforma
    • Please provide some additional lines using your own language on why we need to protect ancient rock art. It will increase the chances of our submissions’ success.

Please comment on the two projects using the texts below to guide you.


“It is in the vital interest of the State that the plans for this project undergoes a Public Environmental Review (PER). This is due to the environmental, social and cultural impacts that this plant is likely to generate. Three core reasons for a PER are predominantly due to the delicate ancient indigenous rock art (petroglyphs) which adorn the Burrup Peninsula and surrounds; they are:

  1. The need to evaluate and reduce the cumulative air-shed of pollutants and all emissions that impact on the Gazettal’s of the Burrup and Dampier.
  2. The recent initiation of the process of World Heritage Listing the area and the threat new industry has on a successful outcome.”
  3. The lack of consideration of alternative, more appropriate sites in the area.

“It is in the vital interest of the State that the plans for this project undergoes a Public Environmental Review (PER). This is due to the environmental, social and cultural impacts that this plant is likely to generate. Four core reasons for a PER are predominantly due to the delicate ancient indigenous rock art (petroglyphs) which adorn the Burrup Peninsula and surrounds; they are:

  1. This project will over time provide gas to and from the Pluto LNG facility and the North West Shelf facility and by its very nature increase the variety of emissions on the Burrup.
  2. This transfer of gas needs to be evaluated as part of the cumulative air-shed of pollutants and all emissions that impact on the Gazettal’s of the Burrup and Dampier.
  3. All of the current proposed developments and expansions fail to address consideration of alternative, more appropriate sites in the area.
  4. The potential for fugitive emissions from this pipeline need to be fully assessed.

    The Burrup needs you.